Great Dane

Origin

The Great Dane, also known as “Apollo of all dogs”, appeared on Egyptian sites around 3000 BC. They were valued for their ability to fight off bears and wild pigs. The mid-sixteenth century, European nobility imported from England this solid, high-leg race. These dogs were called Franzoesische Docke or Franzoesische Tocke. The dogs were used to hunt bears, pigs and deer in the royal courts. The name Great Dane emerged in the 1700s, when a French naturalist saw in Denmark a variant of the Boar Hound which was thinner and looked more like a greyhound. He called this dog the Great Dane, who in the end became The Great Dane Dog. German breeders are known to have refined the breed to the current smart dog. The Great Dane was recognized in 1887 as a breed in its own.

Description

The Great Dane is a large and powerful dog. Generally of square appearance, females can be a little longer than taller. The coat is short, smooth and thick. The six common colors are:

  • Fawn (a bright color with a dark veil)
  • Brindle (fawn and black mixed around the body in a tiger stripe pattern)
  • Blue (steel blue, which is really a kind of gray)
  • Black
  • Harlequin (white with dark spots on the whole body)
  • Mantle (high contrast black and white with a full black layer on the body)

Unrecognized, the chocolate color occurs in a recessive gene. Merle is a typical consequence of the reproduction of the Harlequin without being a recognized nuance. Other colors appear more rarely. It’s one of those giant breeds, but it is exceptional as its general appearance is never disgraceful. Year after year, the largest known dog is typically a Great Dane. Previously, when the Great Dane was used to hunt wild boar. Their ears were cut off to prevent injuries in the middle of the action. Currently, this is mainly done for aesthetic and traditional reasons. The Great Dane males are 30 to 34 inches (76-86 cm) tall and weighs 120 to 200 pounds (54-90 kg). Females are 28 to 32 inches (71-81 cm) tall and weigh 100 to 130 pounds (45-59 kg). Their normal life expectancy is 10 years, but some can live up to 12-13 years.

Temperament

The Great Dane, usually called “gentle giant”, has a good attitude. Charming and tender, he is fun, loving and patient with children. He loves everyone and needs to be surrounded by people. The Great Dane does not bark much and becomes aggressive only when the circumstances require it. He is reliable and loyal. Courageous, he is a good watchdog. When we live with them, we become members of their pack. The whole pack follows a single leader. You and all humans should be higher in the hierarchy than the dog. If by chance you are not firm, constant and confident or does not correct him if necessary, the Great Dane can become aggressive with other dogs. However, the Great Dane is generally well-disposed toward other dogs, pets, and well-known people.

Living conditions

Like most dogs, the Great Dane needs daily walking to maintain their well-being. Anyway, it is essential not to over train this race, especially during adolescence. Puppies grow very quickly, leaving them vulnerable to bone and joint problems. Despite his large size, a Great Dane is gentle enough to be a good indoor dog. His is not meant for a small apartment because he might hit everything. He can get cold in winter, so he should not be left outside in cold atmospheres. He is usually quiet inside. In case you plan on keeping him in a yard, you need a wall six feet (1.80m) high. You must also understand that he really loves to destroy his environment.

Care

Their smooth short haired coat is easy to maintain. Use a stiff brush and dry shampoo when necessary. Showering the giant is a delicate task, so it is best avoided with daily washing. This breed shed profusely.

German Boxer

Origin

The Boxer was created in Germany in the nineteenth century. His Ancestors were two mastiffs, the Bullenbeisser and the Barenbeisser. They were then crossed with the powerful ancestors of the Mastiff and the Bulldog. The first Boxers were used as fighting dogs, for the bullfight, as sled dogs, and as shepherd dogs, to round up the animals and watch preys. They were later popular dogs in circuses and theaters. The main line of Boxers began in 1904. Breeders have raised two kinds of Boxers, the German Boxer and the American Boxer. German Boxers have bigger heads and are largely more muscular than American Boxers. The name “Boxer” comes from the propensity of the dog to remain on his hind legs and to “box” with his front paws. The name could also come from the very first specimens of the breed (Lechner’s Box, for example).

Description

The body of the Boxer is compact and powerful. Males are normally 22.5 to 25 inches (57-63 cm) high at the shoulder and weigh about 70 pounds (32 kg). Females usually measure from 21 to 23.5 inches (53-60 cm) at the shoulder and weigh about 60 pounds (27 kg). Their life expectancy is about 11-14 years. Boxers were originally docked and cropped breed, but this was forbidden in many countries around the world. The Boxer is a short-haired breed, with a smooth, soft coat that sticks to the body. The Boxer does not have the gene for black color and that is why only black Boxers do not exist. They come in two colors: fawn or brindle, with or without white markings. Tawny color varies from pale tan to mahogany. Brindle is a striking example of striped coat with dark stripes on a fawn base. Boxers with white markings covering more than one third of their coat – commonly called Boxers “white” – are neither albinos nor rare; approximately 20-25% of all Boxers are white.

Temper

The Boxer is happy, brave, playful, curious and lively. Very clever, eager and quick to learn, the Boxer is a dog suited for obedience. He is always moving and stays close to his family. Loyal and affectionate, Boxers are known to get along well with young people. His nature is to protect you, your family and your home. They will welcome know guests. They are always willing to work and play. Boxers need human authority and a dominant master. This breed is known for his courage which makes him a special watchdog. This dog needs to go every day walking or strolling. Day after day, mental and physical activity is central. Without it, the Boxer gets nervous. They are dynamic and strong. They need a satisfactory activity to avoid boredom-related practices, such as biting, digging, or licking. The Boxer by nature is not an aggressive or vicious breed. It’s an instinctive guard and can become very attached to his family. Like all dogs, he needs an appropriate socialization. Boxers are mostly patients with other dogs, but difficulties can occur with the most massive breeds, especially dogs of the same sex. The Boxer is portrayed as a guard dog, alert and vigilant, who listens.

Living conditions

Boxers can live well in an apartment if they are active enough. They are quite dynamic in it but are better with a courtyard. Boxers are sensitive to temperature, low or high. Boxers are indoor dogs. Their noses and short coats make them unfit to live outside, despite the fact that they like to play in a fenced yard. Dynamic physical race, Boxers need daily work or activity, and a long and brisk walk. They also love to fetch a ball or participate in other games.

Care

Their smooth and shorthaired coat is not difficult to maintain. Just use a firm brush and bathe them if necessary, as it expels the natural oils from their skin. Some Boxers try to keep themselves clean, cleaning themselves as cats, but some cannot avoid getting dirty, which calls for a shower. This breed shed normally.

Doberman Pinscher

Origin

In the late nineteenth century, a German citizen named Louis Doberman began dog breeding with the idea of a flawless companion and defender. The beginning of the Doberman Pinscher was formalized in 1876. He was created to be a “super dog”. In 1900, the German Kennel Club recognized the Doberman Pinscher as a fully-fledged breed. Over the years, breeders have worked tenaciously to soften the strong identity of the first specimen – with excellent results. Despite the fact that the Doberman is protective of his family and home, he is known as a loving and reliable partner.

Description

The Doberman is a dog of medium and square build, with a compact and muscular body, fast and resilient. The dog normally measure between 26 and 28 inches (66 – 71cm), 27 being perfect. The female is somewhere between 24 and 26 inches (61-66cm), 25 being perfect. They both weigh around 66 and 88 pounds (30-40 kg). A Doberman “Warlock” is a given Doberman that is larger than the standard size. Two distinct types of colors exist in the Doberman, dark and dilution color, which result in four different colors: black, red, blue and fawn. White Dobermans are cream with pristine white markings and bright blue eyes. The standard tail of the Doberman Pinscher is quite long, but it is usually cut by the owner. Similarly, Dobermans generally have cropped ears. Their life expectancy is about 13 years.

Temper

The Doberman is generally of cheerful disposition, vigilant, determined and dedicated. The Doberman is passionate, very energetic, with strength and endurance. They need the human authority and interaction. They are extremely versatile and talented. They are wise and easy to train. They are remarkable guard and watch dogs. They do not require additional training for protection. This breed is not for everyone. The Doberman needs a master who is ready and willing to show a natural leadership on the dog. All owners must be firm, confident and consistent, dictating the rules and sticking to them. You have to manage these dogs because they can be stubborn and determined if they can do what they want. They should be thoroughly socialized in their youth to avoid agitation. Daily mental and physical stimulation is imperative to keep a happy and stable minded Doberman. They are generally sociable with people and possibly with other dogs. Anyway, Dobermans are among the breeds most likely to show aggressive behavior toward strangers and other dogs. They are not likely to show aggressive behavior towards their owners. It was shown that the Doberman in North America has a quieter, more even temper than their European counterparts due to the breeding methods used by American breeders. The Doberman Pinscher is considered as one of the most intelligent dog breeds in the baseline assessments. A super-clever and super-dynamic puppy is what you get when you get a Doberman Pinscher. He is a born defender who will not hesitate to attack when he assumes that his family is at risk, but he does not use force unnecessarily.

Living conditions

He will live well in an apartment if sufficiently active. However, he is more comfortable with a courtyard. Dobermans are very sensitive to cold weather and are not outdoor dogs. The Doberman Pinscher is better suited for a suburban or country home with space to relax. He needs a lot of daily activity. He needs a home with a fence for his safety and well-being and the one of individuals or creatures that walk unwittingly into his grass court. He should not be left alone or in the back yard as an outdoor dog for long periods. He should not be chained. He must be part of the family, and take part in all the exercises of the family.

Care

The Doberman was originally bred to have a low maintenance coat. This one is short, shed little, is not difficult to wash and dry quickly. The current Doberman still meets these expectations, with beauty as an additional objective. The coat of the Doberman must shine, stay flat and straight, and act as a second skin.

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Origin

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is supposed to come from the Dachshund group. The ancestors of the Cardigan Welsh have been introduced in Wales more than 3000 years BC by Celtic tribes coming from central Europe. Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh Corgi were crossed and treated as the same breed until 1934. The name “corgi” is specific to this breed of dog in Welsh (Cymreig). The phrase “cor gi” is still translated as “dwarf dog” in Welsh. The current name comes from their region of origin: Ceredigion in Wales. Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh Corgi were recognized by the Kennel Club in 1928. They were used to herd cattle, hunt vermin and protect the farm. They can drive the cows, barking and biting. Their small size allows them to avoid cattle kicking. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi has never been as popular as Pembrokes, probably due to the impact of the Royal family. However, they found their place in many parts of the world. They are always extremely valued for their ability to work, care and herd, in addition to their companionship.

Description

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a long and close to the ground dog. Their backs are not really longer than most dogs, their legs are just shorter. Their coat has a layer of short, thick and resistant hair covered by a longer and coarser coat. The coat is longer at the collar, the rear legs and under the tail. Some Corgis called “fluffy Corgis” or “long-haired Corgis” are born with longer coats. The coat colors include red, sand, fawn, brindle, black and brindle, blue merle (black and gray, marbled), black and tan with white spots. There are regular white markings on the legs, abdomen, neck and parts of the muzzle. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi life expectancy is about 12-15 years. A normal Cardigan Welsh Corgi is about 10.5 to 13 inches (260 315 mm) high and weighs 30 to 38 pounds (13.6 to 17.2 kg) for the males and 25 to 34 lb (11, 3 to 15.4 kg) for the females.

Temper

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is very clever and dedicated, capable and ready to please his owner. Reliable, dedicated and loving, yet he can be to be careful with strangers. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi socializes well especially being young. They are dynamic and generally get along very well with young people as the dog sees itself at a lower rank. Their shepherd instinct can push them to chew ankles. Protective and robust, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi are very obedient. They can be aggressive with other dogs if they are not properly trained. They sometimes try to lead people by biting their ankles. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is an active and highly intelligent dog. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is often used as guard dog because he is extremely sensitive to foreign intrusions into his territories. They will be very noisy until they are guaranteed that the intruders pose no threat. They will be cautious with strangers and reserve their affection for a few close humans.

Living conditions

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi needs a daily walk or a training. If sufficiently active, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi will thrive in any environment, apartment or country house. With enough activity, he will be quiet inside, and will be very active otherwise. Problems appear if the dog feels superior to his master, or does not get enough exercise during the day. The cardigan has a coat to sustain the harsh climate of Wales, but that does not mean he is an outside dog. He is close to people and should not be relegated to the terrace with minimal human communication.

Care

With short legs and a long back, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi may be prone to developing injuries. As their skeletal development is not yet complete, you must avoid letting the puppies bouncing on furniture or lifting them without supporting both front and back legs. Their coat is easy to maintain. Use a stiff bristle brush and bathe them only when necessary. They lose their hair continually, with intense shedding twice a year. Daily brushing and hot showers is needed during these periods.

Bullmastiff

Origin

The Bullmastiff is a relatively new breed that was developed in the mid-nineteenth century. The Bullmastiff was obtained in England by cross-breeding 60% of Great Danes and 40% of Bulldogs. Some Bullmastiff are listed in archives as early as 1795. The Bullmastiff was used as a guard dog to find, confront and hold poachers. Thus, the Bullmastiff is known as the Gamekeeper’s Night Dog. The dogs were fierce and threatening, but were trained not to bite intruders. The current Bullmastiff is a loyal friend of the family and a good guard. He likes to live with his family, with whom he feels good.

Description

The Bullmastiff is massive, powerful, but not bulky. Males should be 25-28 inches (64-71 cm) tall at the withers and 110 to 130 pounds (50 to 59 kg). Females should be 24 to 26 inches (61-66 cm) tall, and 100-120 pounds (45-54 kg). Their life expectancy is less than 10 years. Their coat is short, thick and slightly hard, offering great protection against rain, snow and cold. His color can be brindle, fawn, or red, often with dark markings on the head. The fawn may vary from light brown to reddish brown. Red can range from a light red-fawn to a dark rich red. The ridges are superimposed fawn or red striped. The Bullmastiff should not have white markings, except on the chest where a little white is allowed.

Temper

The perfect Bullmastiff is bold and confident, but obedient to the will of his masters. Intelligent and reliable, he can be independent, but he needs to please. He is a natural guardian of the home and family and will react immediately to threats. The Bullmastiff was bred to be a silent guard dog. He will therefore seldom bark. The Bullmastiff is patient and protective with children. But because they are so massive, they can hit or walk over little children accidentally. The Bullmastiff can be aggressive with dogs he does not know. He behaves best with dogs of the opposite sex, especially if he was raised with them. He can coexist with cats if raised with them, even if some cannot help but chasing them. The Bullmastiff is a devoted dog, a great guard with a friendly demeanor. He is docile and friendly, but fearless if provoked. Not inclined to aggression, he will however catch an intruder, put him on the ground and keep him there.

Living conditions

The Bullmastiff is a dog of low vitality that can adapt well to most houses, although his size makes him best suited for homes with a fenced yard. They cannot withstand extreme temperatures. Apart from preventing him from wandering, a protective barrier prevents the Bullmastiff from expanding his territory beyond the house and yard. The Bullmastiff should be taken for a walk every day to satisfy his primitive migration instincts. Those who do not meet these needs are more likely to have behavioral problems.

Care

The short-haired, slightly hard, coat is not difficult to maintain. Use a stiff brush and clean the dog if necessary. This breed is losing his hair a bit.

Black Russian Terrier

Origin

A legacy of the Cold War, the Black Russian Terrier was produced by scientists from the Soviet army who sought to create the ideal working dog. The goal was a massive, strong and courageous dog, always willing to work and able to withstand extreme climatic contrasts. Perfectly adapted for Russian hostile winters, the Black Russian Terrier was trained to patrol the borders with the soldiers. In 1958, the Soviet Army originally created the first standard for the Black Russian Terrier. Officially, the Black Russian Terrier was granted the breed status by the Soviet Ministry of Agriculture in 1981 and it did not take long for him to become a star among the most popular breeds in the world because of its characteristics: large size, the ability to secure homes and families, great working capacity, boldness, exquisite appearance, usability and adoration of children.

Description

The Black Russian Terrier is larger than the average size. They seem incredibly powerful, athletic, and courageous. They may have a rustic look but not coarse. The double layer coat is made of an outer coarse protection layer on a soft undercoat. The coat is hard and thick, never delicate, woolly, silky or rolled. It should be between 5 and 15 cm (2-6 inches) long. They have dark coats, but a curl of clear gray hairs can sometimes be seen, even in puppies. Males are 72 to 76 cm (2.3 to 2.5 inches) tall but not more than 78 inches at the withers. The female are 68 to 72 cm (2.2 to 2.3 inches) tall and not more than 74 cm. The male weighs between 50 and 60 kg (110-132 lb) and females weigh between 45 and 50 kg (99-110 lb). Their life expectancy is about 10-14 years.

Temper

The Black Russian Terrier is a calm dog, secure, courageous and confident. He is very clever and accepts well dressage. The Black Russian Terrier was thought to protect and secure. He is prudent and sensitive, intuitive, protective, determined, fearless and deeply devoted to his family. The Black Russian Terrier is distant and therefore does not appreciate any invasion of his personal space by strangers. Extremely intelligent, the Black Russian Terrier needs work to do. Training them is simple. The Black Russian Terrier loves children and protects them. They are indoor dogs and need to feel like a family member. They are not suited for a life on the terrace. They need a constant attention and orientation, and will turn in on themselves in the opposite case.
The Black Russian Terrier is wary of strangers and have a strong and solid defensive intuition. This breed seeks contact with people and animals. They shall refrain from fighting with other dogs, although males cannot live with other large dominant dogs without a strong master. They can easily live with small or non-dominant dogs, felines, stallions, rabbits, etc. They are not hard to tame and should easily accept the leash. The Black Russian Terrier barks only when they consider it necessary. Quick to act, they are constantly ready to protect their masters and their home. The Black Russian Terrier takes some time to fully develop.

Living conditions

The Black Russian Terrier will live well in an apartment if he is sufficiently exercising. They are usually calm inside and whatever the size of your yard, they will be sitting at your front door waiting for you. They want to live close to their masters and require human contact to be happy. The Black Russian Terrier is always ready for a long day walk each day. They want to cavort, play and entertain themselves. The vast majority of them like snow and water. They will roll into the snow and jump into the water.

Care

Their waterproof coat has a layer of hard, dry, tight, well coated and corrugated hair about 1.5 “- 4” (4 -10 cm) long. The undercoat is tight and well developed. Regular cut is needed 2 or 3 times a year. You should brush the Black Russian Terrier at least once a week. They do not shed too much but can leave little balls of fur.