Doberman Pinscher

Origin

In the late nineteenth century, a German citizen named Louis Doberman began dog breeding with the idea of a flawless companion and defender. The beginning of the Doberman Pinscher was formalized in 1876. He was created to be a “super dog”. In 1900, the German Kennel Club recognized the Doberman Pinscher as a fully-fledged breed. Over the years, breeders have worked tenaciously to soften the strong identity of the first specimen – with excellent results. Despite the fact that the Doberman is protective of his family and home, he is known as a loving and reliable partner.

Description

The Doberman is a dog of medium and square build, with a compact and muscular body, fast and resilient. The dog normally measure between 26 and 28 inches (66 – 71cm), 27 being perfect. The female is somewhere between 24 and 26 inches (61-66cm), 25 being perfect. They both weigh around 66 and 88 pounds (30-40 kg). A Doberman “Warlock” is a given Doberman that is larger than the standard size. Two distinct types of colors exist in the Doberman, dark and dilution color, which result in four different colors: black, red, blue and fawn. White Dobermans are cream with pristine white markings and bright blue eyes. The standard tail of the Doberman Pinscher is quite long, but it is usually cut by the owner. Similarly, Dobermans generally have cropped ears. Their life expectancy is about 13 years.

Temper

The Doberman is generally of cheerful disposition, vigilant, determined and dedicated. The Doberman is passionate, very energetic, with strength and endurance. They need the human authority and interaction. They are extremely versatile and talented. They are wise and easy to train. They are remarkable guard and watch dogs. They do not require additional training for protection. This breed is not for everyone. The Doberman needs a master who is ready and willing to show a natural leadership on the dog. All owners must be firm, confident and consistent, dictating the rules and sticking to them. You have to manage these dogs because they can be stubborn and determined if they can do what they want. They should be thoroughly socialized in their youth to avoid agitation. Daily mental and physical stimulation is imperative to keep a happy and stable minded Doberman. They are generally sociable with people and possibly with other dogs. Anyway, Dobermans are among the breeds most likely to show aggressive behavior toward strangers and other dogs. They are not likely to show aggressive behavior towards their owners. It was shown that the Doberman in North America has a quieter, more even temper than their European counterparts due to the breeding methods used by American breeders. The Doberman Pinscher is considered as one of the most intelligent dog breeds in the baseline assessments. A super-clever and super-dynamic puppy is what you get when you get a Doberman Pinscher. He is a born defender who will not hesitate to attack when he assumes that his family is at risk, but he does not use force unnecessarily.

Living conditions

He will live well in an apartment if sufficiently active. However, he is more comfortable with a courtyard. Dobermans are very sensitive to cold weather and are not outdoor dogs. The Doberman Pinscher is better suited for a suburban or country home with space to relax. He needs a lot of daily activity. He needs a home with a fence for his safety and well-being and the one of individuals or creatures that walk unwittingly into his grass court. He should not be left alone or in the back yard as an outdoor dog for long periods. He should not be chained. He must be part of the family, and take part in all the exercises of the family.

Care

The Doberman was originally bred to have a low maintenance coat. This one is short, shed little, is not difficult to wash and dry quickly. The current Doberman still meets these expectations, with beauty as an additional objective. The coat of the Doberman must shine, stay flat and straight, and act as a second skin.

Black Russian Terrier

Origin

A legacy of the Cold War, the Black Russian Terrier was produced by scientists from the Soviet army who sought to create the ideal working dog. The goal was a massive, strong and courageous dog, always willing to work and able to withstand extreme climatic contrasts. Perfectly adapted for Russian hostile winters, the Black Russian Terrier was trained to patrol the borders with the soldiers. In 1958, the Soviet Army originally created the first standard for the Black Russian Terrier. Officially, the Black Russian Terrier was granted the breed status by the Soviet Ministry of Agriculture in 1981 and it did not take long for him to become a star among the most popular breeds in the world because of its characteristics: large size, the ability to secure homes and families, great working capacity, boldness, exquisite appearance, usability and adoration of children.

Description

The Black Russian Terrier is larger than the average size. They seem incredibly powerful, athletic, and courageous. They may have a rustic look but not coarse. The double layer coat is made of an outer coarse protection layer on a soft undercoat. The coat is hard and thick, never delicate, woolly, silky or rolled. It should be between 5 and 15 cm (2-6 inches) long. They have dark coats, but a curl of clear gray hairs can sometimes be seen, even in puppies. Males are 72 to 76 cm (2.3 to 2.5 inches) tall but not more than 78 inches at the withers. The female are 68 to 72 cm (2.2 to 2.3 inches) tall and not more than 74 cm. The male weighs between 50 and 60 kg (110-132 lb) and females weigh between 45 and 50 kg (99-110 lb). Their life expectancy is about 10-14 years.

Temper

The Black Russian Terrier is a calm dog, secure, courageous and confident. He is very clever and accepts well dressage. The Black Russian Terrier was thought to protect and secure. He is prudent and sensitive, intuitive, protective, determined, fearless and deeply devoted to his family. The Black Russian Terrier is distant and therefore does not appreciate any invasion of his personal space by strangers. Extremely intelligent, the Black Russian Terrier needs work to do. Training them is simple. The Black Russian Terrier loves children and protects them. They are indoor dogs and need to feel like a family member. They are not suited for a life on the terrace. They need a constant attention and orientation, and will turn in on themselves in the opposite case.
The Black Russian Terrier is wary of strangers and have a strong and solid defensive intuition. This breed seeks contact with people and animals. They shall refrain from fighting with other dogs, although males cannot live with other large dominant dogs without a strong master. They can easily live with small or non-dominant dogs, felines, stallions, rabbits, etc. They are not hard to tame and should easily accept the leash. The Black Russian Terrier barks only when they consider it necessary. Quick to act, they are constantly ready to protect their masters and their home. The Black Russian Terrier takes some time to fully develop.

Living conditions

The Black Russian Terrier will live well in an apartment if he is sufficiently exercising. They are usually calm inside and whatever the size of your yard, they will be sitting at your front door waiting for you. They want to live close to their masters and require human contact to be happy. The Black Russian Terrier is always ready for a long day walk each day. They want to cavort, play and entertain themselves. The vast majority of them like snow and water. They will roll into the snow and jump into the water.

Care

Their waterproof coat has a layer of hard, dry, tight, well coated and corrugated hair about 1.5 “- 4” (4 -10 cm) long. The undercoat is tight and well developed. Regular cut is needed 2 or 3 times a year. You should brush the Black Russian Terrier at least once a week. They do not shed too much but can leave little balls of fur.