Jack Russell Terrier

Origin

The Jack Russell Terrier was created in the south of England in the mid-1800s by John Russell Parson, whose name gave the race. The roots of the Jack Russell Terrier back to the now extinct English White Terrier. Russell intended to make a working terrier to hunt with other dogs, dislodging foxes from their burrows for other dogs to pursue them. An essential quality of his Jack Russell Terrier was a tempered aggressiveness. It gave him the important ability to pursue and scare foxes without causing them physical damage and thus put an end to the hunt. This would have been considered unsporting. The capabilities of the Jack Russell Terrier include: hunting, tracking, being agile and doing tricks. Many breeds can claim an inheritance from the Fox Terrier of this period, as the Brazilian Terrier, the Japanese Terrier, the Miniature Fox Terrier, the Ratonero Bodeguero Andaluz and the Tenterfield Terrier. Arthur Blake Heinemann created the breed standard. A first split occured between the show and work terriers. Another separation occurred between two distinct kinds of White Terrier, wearing both the name Jack Russell. After World War II, the need for hunting dogs was radically reduced, and with it the amount of Jack Russell Terrier. These dogs were then increasingly used as pets in families.

Description

The Jack Russell Terrier is a strong dog and a sturdy terrier, almost always on its feet. The body length should be proportional to the height. The Jack Russell Terrier should present a compact and balanced image, always in a good and solid condition. The coat is rough or broken. These two kinds of fur have a double coat with a coarse structure. The broken coat is slightly long with just an extension of the eyebrows and a beard. Some Jack Russell Terrier have a hard coat that is longer than the broken coat. Whatever its type, the hair is never curly or wavy. It should be predominantly white (over 51% white) with tan, black or brown markings. Marbled markings and black and tan coloration occur but remain rare. Due to the nature of their use, the Jack Russell Terrier remained almost as they were 200 years ago. The Jack Russell Terrier size varies widely, because different types of dogs were used for specific purposes and in many types of environments. They usually measure 10 to 15 inches (25-38 cm) at the withers and weigh 14 to 18 pounds (6.4 to 8.2 kg).

Temper

The Jack Russell Terrier are mostly working terriers. Originally bred to hunt fox in his lair in the middle of the hunts, they are used for different prey living in burrows, such as the woodchuck or the badger. The work of the Jack Russell Terrier is to locate the prey underground, and to dislodge or hold it in place until a hole is digged that far. For this, the dog will not bark but will continuously monitor the prey. The Jack Russell Terrier tends to be surprisingly insightful, athletic, bold, and vocal. It is not uncommon for these dogs to become aggressive or destructive if they are not properly trained or stimulated. They tend to get bored easily and then go to practice alone when they are left to themselves. Their vitality and energy make them suitable for various canine games, such as Fly Ball. Dog training is also recommended to potential owners, as the Jack Russell Terrier can be stubborn at times and becomes aggressive towards other animals and humans if not properly socialized. They have a huge amount of energy for their size. Some Jack Russell Terrier are aggressive toward other dogs, especially those of the same sex. They have a strong prey drive and chase (and occasionally kill) cats and other small creatures. They can never seem to get bored and will always be energetic after a hard day. Even though properly socialized dogs are benevolent towards children, they will not accept bad gestures, even unintentional.

Living Conditions

The Jack Russell Terrier is a pleasant companion when he is sufficiently exercised. However, in case he does not get enough exercise, he can become an annoyance. He must be taken for a long walk every day. In addition, he will be in his environment with space to run, hunt and play. In cases where the Jack Russell Terrier is left alone during the day, whether in a loft or a house, he must go on a long walk before you leave and after you return. Letting him do 30-45 minutes of intense exercise every day and a lot of play in the yard without a collar keeps him tired and out of trouble. The Jack Russell Terrier is affectionate and loving. They may well live in homes with experienced children who know how to behave with them. They are not suitable for homes with young children. In addition to being uncontrollable, they can break everything when they are poorly cared of. Always teach children how to approach and touch these dogs. You must supervise the interactions between the dogs and young children to avoid biting, ear or tail pulling from either side. You need to teach children never to approach the Jack Russell Terrier while he sleeps or eats. You should never try to take their food.

Care

Their coat requires weekly brushing to uproot the dead and loose hair. If you brush your Jack Russell Terrier firmly, he should rarely require a shower.

Dalmatian

 

Origin

The origins of this race remains a riddle. In 1993, the CFI recognized his Croatian roots at last. The Dalmatian got his name during his stay in Dalmatia, which is currently known as Croatia. In the Middle Ages he was utilized as a hunting dog. The main representations of the dog have been found in Croatia like an altarpiece in Veli Lošinj from 1600 to 1630. The breed got to be prevalent in the 1800s to protect the carriages and steeds. It was in England that the Dalmatian became without a doubt a coaching dog. The primary informal standard of the breed was presented by an Englishman in 1882, Vero Shaw. To date, the Dalmatian has a characteristic fondness for horses. In the United States, he turned into a firehouse dog, to run with the horses to the blaze, watch over the supplies, and even save individuals from fire.

Description

The Dalmatian is a huge, husky and solid dog. His round eyes are brown, blue or a blend of both. His short coat is extremely thick with fine hairs and is pleasant to touch, being short and silky. The symmetrical coat is dominatingly white with unmistakably characterized round spots. The spots might be dark, brown (liver), lemon, dark blue, brindle, beige or sand. Puppies are conceived with smooth white layers. Their first spots typically show up within three weeks. After a month, they have the vast majority of their spots, despite the fact that they keep on developing all through life at a much slower pace. You can also see tricolor Dalmatians puppies with flame-like markings on the head, neck, legs, or a dark tail. The Dalmatian is a clean pet with practically no smell and his coat doesn’t get dirty. Males and females are somewhere between 19 and 24 inches (48 to 60 cm) high. They weigh between 48 and 55 pounds (21-25 kg). Males are for the most part bigger than females. The Dalmatian is a brawny medium-sized pet with phenomenal resilience and endurance. Their life expectancy is about 10-12 years.

Temper

The Dalmatian is patient and has an incredible measure of vitality. They dislike lounging around throughout the day doing nothing. They are playful, agreeable and extremely committed. The Dalmatian needs a ton of leadership from humans to be happy. They won’t be well if they are left in the yard throughout the day and are known to dig gigantic holes otherwise. The Dalmatian loves to play with youngsters. However, in the event that they don’t get enough physical and mental activity, they can get exceptionally anxious and excessively energized for a little kid. This energy accumulation destabilize their mind and they can get shy without enough socialization. They coexist well with different pets, however without human mediation, they can get to be forceful with unknown dogs. Extremely shrewd, they are for the most part social. The Dalmatian can be trained with a high level of obedience. They could be prepared for defense and are great guard dogs. The young Dalmatian is extremely vigorous and needs a large amount of activity. If you can provide them with what they require instinctually, they will make great pets and will quiet down after a couple of years. They cherish consideration and have a solid yearning to please. The training is eased by prizes, for example, nourishment, acclaims, and play. The Dalmatian is cautious and intrigued by everything happening around him and makes an astounding guard dog.

Living conditions

A Dalmatian is not a perfect dog for condos unless it is possible for him to go strolling or running a few times each day, right by or behind you. They are exceptionally dynamic inside the house with no less than one meter as medium size. They cannot live outside in chilly weather. On the off chance that these dogs are bored, and don’t go out consistently, they can start damaging stuff and begin to show behavioral issues.

Care

The Dalmatian shed as the year progresses, and more copiously twice a year. He should be brushed frequently to overcome consistent shedding. They have no doggy smell and should be clean. They even maintain a strategic distance from puddles. They must bathe just when needed. The Dalmatian appetite depends on his size, age, build, digestion system and action level. It practically goes without saying that an excessively dynamic dog will require more than a couple of pieces of dry food.

Great Dane

Origin

The Great Dane, also known as “Apollo of all dogs”, appeared on Egyptian sites around 3000 BC. They were valued for their ability to fight off bears and wild pigs. The mid-sixteenth century, European nobility imported from England this solid, high-leg race. These dogs were called Franzoesische Docke or Franzoesische Tocke. The dogs were used to hunt bears, pigs and deer in the royal courts. The name Great Dane emerged in the 1700s, when a French naturalist saw in Denmark a variant of the Boar Hound which was thinner and looked more like a greyhound. He called this dog the Great Dane, who in the end became The Great Dane Dog. German breeders are known to have refined the breed to the current smart dog. The Great Dane was recognized in 1887 as a breed in its own.

Description

The Great Dane is a large and powerful dog. Generally of square appearance, females can be a little longer than taller. The coat is short, smooth and thick. The six common colors are:

  • Fawn (a bright color with a dark veil)
  • Brindle (fawn and black mixed around the body in a tiger stripe pattern)
  • Blue (steel blue, which is really a kind of gray)
  • Black
  • Harlequin (white with dark spots on the whole body)
  • Mantle (high contrast black and white with a full black layer on the body)

Unrecognized, the chocolate color occurs in a recessive gene. Merle is a typical consequence of the reproduction of the Harlequin without being a recognized nuance. Other colors appear more rarely. It’s one of those giant breeds, but it is exceptional as its general appearance is never disgraceful. Year after year, the largest known dog is typically a Great Dane. Previously, when the Great Dane was used to hunt wild boar. Their ears were cut off to prevent injuries in the middle of the action. Currently, this is mainly done for aesthetic and traditional reasons. The Great Dane males are 30 to 34 inches (76-86 cm) tall and weighs 120 to 200 pounds (54-90 kg). Females are 28 to 32 inches (71-81 cm) tall and weigh 100 to 130 pounds (45-59 kg). Their normal life expectancy is 10 years, but some can live up to 12-13 years.

Temperament

The Great Dane, usually called “gentle giant”, has a good attitude. Charming and tender, he is fun, loving and patient with children. He loves everyone and needs to be surrounded by people. The Great Dane does not bark much and becomes aggressive only when the circumstances require it. He is reliable and loyal. Courageous, he is a good watchdog. When we live with them, we become members of their pack. The whole pack follows a single leader. You and all humans should be higher in the hierarchy than the dog. If by chance you are not firm, constant and confident or does not correct him if necessary, the Great Dane can become aggressive with other dogs. However, the Great Dane is generally well-disposed toward other dogs, pets, and well-known people.

Living conditions

Like most dogs, the Great Dane needs daily walking to maintain their well-being. Anyway, it is essential not to over train this race, especially during adolescence. Puppies grow very quickly, leaving them vulnerable to bone and joint problems. Despite his large size, a Great Dane is gentle enough to be a good indoor dog. His is not meant for a small apartment because he might hit everything. He can get cold in winter, so he should not be left outside in cold atmospheres. He is usually quiet inside. In case you plan on keeping him in a yard, you need a wall six feet (1.80m) high. You must also understand that he really loves to destroy his environment.

Care

Their smooth short haired coat is easy to maintain. Use a stiff brush and dry shampoo when necessary. Showering the giant is a delicate task, so it is best avoided with daily washing. This breed shed profusely.