Jack Russell Terrier

Origin

The Jack Russell Terrier was created in the south of England in the mid-1800s by John Russell Parson, whose name gave the race. The roots of the Jack Russell Terrier back to the now extinct English White Terrier. Russell intended to make a working terrier to hunt with other dogs, dislodging foxes from their burrows for other dogs to pursue them. An essential quality of his Jack Russell Terrier was a tempered aggressiveness. It gave him the important ability to pursue and scare foxes without causing them physical damage and thus put an end to the hunt. This would have been considered unsporting. The capabilities of the Jack Russell Terrier include: hunting, tracking, being agile and doing tricks. Many breeds can claim an inheritance from the Fox Terrier of this period, as the Brazilian Terrier, the Japanese Terrier, the Miniature Fox Terrier, the Ratonero Bodeguero Andaluz and the Tenterfield Terrier. Arthur Blake Heinemann created the breed standard. A first split occured between the show and work terriers. Another separation occurred between two distinct kinds of White Terrier, wearing both the name Jack Russell. After World War II, the need for hunting dogs was radically reduced, and with it the amount of Jack Russell Terrier. These dogs were then increasingly used as pets in families.

Description

The Jack Russell Terrier is a strong dog and a sturdy terrier, almost always on its feet. The body length should be proportional to the height. The Jack Russell Terrier should present a compact and balanced image, always in a good and solid condition. The coat is rough or broken. These two kinds of fur have a double coat with a coarse structure. The broken coat is slightly long with just an extension of the eyebrows and a beard. Some Jack Russell Terrier have a hard coat that is longer than the broken coat. Whatever its type, the hair is never curly or wavy. It should be predominantly white (over 51% white) with tan, black or brown markings. Marbled markings and black and tan coloration occur but remain rare. Due to the nature of their use, the Jack Russell Terrier remained almost as they were 200 years ago. The Jack Russell Terrier size varies widely, because different types of dogs were used for specific purposes and in many types of environments. They usually measure 10 to 15 inches (25-38 cm) at the withers and weigh 14 to 18 pounds (6.4 to 8.2 kg).

Temper

The Jack Russell Terrier are mostly working terriers. Originally bred to hunt fox in his lair in the middle of the hunts, they are used for different prey living in burrows, such as the woodchuck or the badger. The work of the Jack Russell Terrier is to locate the prey underground, and to dislodge or hold it in place until a hole is digged that far. For this, the dog will not bark but will continuously monitor the prey. The Jack Russell Terrier tends to be surprisingly insightful, athletic, bold, and vocal. It is not uncommon for these dogs to become aggressive or destructive if they are not properly trained or stimulated. They tend to get bored easily and then go to practice alone when they are left to themselves. Their vitality and energy make them suitable for various canine games, such as Fly Ball. Dog training is also recommended to potential owners, as the Jack Russell Terrier can be stubborn at times and becomes aggressive towards other animals and humans if not properly socialized. They have a huge amount of energy for their size. Some Jack Russell Terrier are aggressive toward other dogs, especially those of the same sex. They have a strong prey drive and chase (and occasionally kill) cats and other small creatures. They can never seem to get bored and will always be energetic after a hard day. Even though properly socialized dogs are benevolent towards children, they will not accept bad gestures, even unintentional.

Living Conditions

The Jack Russell Terrier is a pleasant companion when he is sufficiently exercised. However, in case he does not get enough exercise, he can become an annoyance. He must be taken for a long walk every day. In addition, he will be in his environment with space to run, hunt and play. In cases where the Jack Russell Terrier is left alone during the day, whether in a loft or a house, he must go on a long walk before you leave and after you return. Letting him do 30-45 minutes of intense exercise every day and a lot of play in the yard without a collar keeps him tired and out of trouble. The Jack Russell Terrier is affectionate and loving. They may well live in homes with experienced children who know how to behave with them. They are not suitable for homes with young children. In addition to being uncontrollable, they can break everything when they are poorly cared of. Always teach children how to approach and touch these dogs. You must supervise the interactions between the dogs and young children to avoid biting, ear or tail pulling from either side. You need to teach children never to approach the Jack Russell Terrier while he sleeps or eats. You should never try to take their food.

Care

Their coat requires weekly brushing to uproot the dead and loose hair. If you brush your Jack Russell Terrier firmly, he should rarely require a shower.

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Origin

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is supposed to come from the Dachshund group. The ancestors of the Cardigan Welsh have been introduced in Wales more than 3000 years BC by Celtic tribes coming from central Europe. Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh Corgi were crossed and treated as the same breed until 1934. The name “corgi” is specific to this breed of dog in Welsh (Cymreig). The phrase “cor gi” is still translated as “dwarf dog” in Welsh. The current name comes from their region of origin: Ceredigion in Wales. Pembroke and Cardigan Welsh Corgi were recognized by the Kennel Club in 1928. They were used to herd cattle, hunt vermin and protect the farm. They can drive the cows, barking and biting. Their small size allows them to avoid cattle kicking. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi has never been as popular as Pembrokes, probably due to the impact of the Royal family. However, they found their place in many parts of the world. They are always extremely valued for their ability to work, care and herd, in addition to their companionship.

Description

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a long and close to the ground dog. Their backs are not really longer than most dogs, their legs are just shorter. Their coat has a layer of short, thick and resistant hair covered by a longer and coarser coat. The coat is longer at the collar, the rear legs and under the tail. Some Corgis called “fluffy Corgis” or “long-haired Corgis” are born with longer coats. The coat colors include red, sand, fawn, brindle, black and brindle, blue merle (black and gray, marbled), black and tan with white spots. There are regular white markings on the legs, abdomen, neck and parts of the muzzle. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi life expectancy is about 12-15 years. A normal Cardigan Welsh Corgi is about 10.5 to 13 inches (260 315 mm) high and weighs 30 to 38 pounds (13.6 to 17.2 kg) for the males and 25 to 34 lb (11, 3 to 15.4 kg) for the females.

Temper

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is very clever and dedicated, capable and ready to please his owner. Reliable, dedicated and loving, yet he can be to be careful with strangers. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi socializes well especially being young. They are dynamic and generally get along very well with young people as the dog sees itself at a lower rank. Their shepherd instinct can push them to chew ankles. Protective and robust, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi are very obedient. They can be aggressive with other dogs if they are not properly trained. They sometimes try to lead people by biting their ankles. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is an active and highly intelligent dog. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is often used as guard dog because he is extremely sensitive to foreign intrusions into his territories. They will be very noisy until they are guaranteed that the intruders pose no threat. They will be cautious with strangers and reserve their affection for a few close humans.

Living conditions

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi needs a daily walk or a training. If sufficiently active, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi will thrive in any environment, apartment or country house. With enough activity, he will be quiet inside, and will be very active otherwise. Problems appear if the dog feels superior to his master, or does not get enough exercise during the day. The cardigan has a coat to sustain the harsh climate of Wales, but that does not mean he is an outside dog. He is close to people and should not be relegated to the terrace with minimal human communication.

Care

With short legs and a long back, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi may be prone to developing injuries. As their skeletal development is not yet complete, you must avoid letting the puppies bouncing on furniture or lifting them without supporting both front and back legs. Their coat is easy to maintain. Use a stiff bristle brush and bathe them only when necessary. They lose their hair continually, with intense shedding twice a year. Daily brushing and hot showers is needed during these periods.

Bullmastiff

Origin

The Bullmastiff is a relatively new breed that was developed in the mid-nineteenth century. The Bullmastiff was obtained in England by cross-breeding 60% of Great Danes and 40% of Bulldogs. Some Bullmastiff are listed in archives as early as 1795. The Bullmastiff was used as a guard dog to find, confront and hold poachers. Thus, the Bullmastiff is known as the Gamekeeper’s Night Dog. The dogs were fierce and threatening, but were trained not to bite intruders. The current Bullmastiff is a loyal friend of the family and a good guard. He likes to live with his family, with whom he feels good.

Description

The Bullmastiff is massive, powerful, but not bulky. Males should be 25-28 inches (64-71 cm) tall at the withers and 110 to 130 pounds (50 to 59 kg). Females should be 24 to 26 inches (61-66 cm) tall, and 100-120 pounds (45-54 kg). Their life expectancy is less than 10 years. Their coat is short, thick and slightly hard, offering great protection against rain, snow and cold. His color can be brindle, fawn, or red, often with dark markings on the head. The fawn may vary from light brown to reddish brown. Red can range from a light red-fawn to a dark rich red. The ridges are superimposed fawn or red striped. The Bullmastiff should not have white markings, except on the chest where a little white is allowed.

Temper

The perfect Bullmastiff is bold and confident, but obedient to the will of his masters. Intelligent and reliable, he can be independent, but he needs to please. He is a natural guardian of the home and family and will react immediately to threats. The Bullmastiff was bred to be a silent guard dog. He will therefore seldom bark. The Bullmastiff is patient and protective with children. But because they are so massive, they can hit or walk over little children accidentally. The Bullmastiff can be aggressive with dogs he does not know. He behaves best with dogs of the opposite sex, especially if he was raised with them. He can coexist with cats if raised with them, even if some cannot help but chasing them. The Bullmastiff is a devoted dog, a great guard with a friendly demeanor. He is docile and friendly, but fearless if provoked. Not inclined to aggression, he will however catch an intruder, put him on the ground and keep him there.

Living conditions

The Bullmastiff is a dog of low vitality that can adapt well to most houses, although his size makes him best suited for homes with a fenced yard. They cannot withstand extreme temperatures. Apart from preventing him from wandering, a protective barrier prevents the Bullmastiff from expanding his territory beyond the house and yard. The Bullmastiff should be taken for a walk every day to satisfy his primitive migration instincts. Those who do not meet these needs are more likely to have behavioral problems.

Care

The short-haired, slightly hard, coat is not difficult to maintain. Use a stiff brush and clean the dog if necessary. This breed is losing his hair a bit.